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. >> thank you. >> moving on to the nsa. it has been roughly 2.5 months since the edward snowden leaks were exposed to the world and the mass surveillance operations unveiled. to this day, the nsa still is not sure of the extent of these leaks. unnamed sources within the intelligence committee told nbc news that the nsa is overwhelmed trying to figure out what edward snowden took. keith alexander was asked in july about just how much the agency knows regarding the extent of the leaks. >> let me ask you about edward snowden. you cannot tell us what he got but do you feel now that you know what he got? >> yes. >> this latest report contradicts that claim. alexander answered the question in a more general sense, a spokesman said. more news is breaking about the scope of the nsa's surveillance of the internet, particularly u.s. networks. more unnamed government and in taligent's officials -- intelligence officials said the u.s. has the ability to monitor 75% of the domestic internet traffic here. it does this through a series of relationships with internet providers that at the request of the n
>> coming up, the u.s. government released documents showing a past secret court ruling on nsa surveillance. they chastise the nsa for illegally collecting tens of thousands of e-mails. the unmasking ahead. the army whistleblower manning sentenced to 35 years in prison for leaking documents but the story does not end there. we will look at the extreme conditions placed on the media as we covered the trial. in san francisco, officials are considering a class-action lawsuit against nevada, laming it gave hundreds of psychiatric patients at one-way ticket to california. it is thursday, august 22. 5 p.m. in washington dc. while the obama administration is trying to beat its critics to the punch in the wake of the nsa surveillance scandal, they are coming clean, in a way, anyway. and the ruling that came out in 2011 after the electronic frontier foundation filed a request pretty recently. the court lambasted the nsa for illegally collecting as many as 56,000 e-mails from innocent people each year over three years. then the nsa proceeded to misrepresent the size and scope of that col
>> coming up, concern growing over the expansion of nsa surveillance since the war on terror started. employees were spying on their lovers. the agency was spying on uniteded nations. and that's just what we found out over the weekend. we'll speak with a former agent turned whistleblower ahead. the conflict in syria may have reached a boiling point. secretary of state john kerry says he has no doubt they used chemical weapons on civilians. is intervention inevitable? and speaking of chemical weapons, a new report details how the u.s. once held saddam hussein and the iraqis with its chemical weapons attacks on iranian troops. ♪ tens of thousands gathered at the nation's capital this weekend in remembrance of the 1963 march on washington. even though the nation has come a very long way, many feel that the struggle for martin luther king's dream still continues. more on the sights and sounds later in today's show. it's monday, august 26. pam 5 p.m. in washington, d.c. the national security agency was once the most secretive organization in the u.s. now, hardly a day goes by wh
. whethenow to an ongoing issue oe nsa. it has been the subject of controversy since the lakes of edward snowden which demonstrated the agency was spying on american citizens and breaking court order drills to do so. in a new interview, president obama said this over -- about the oversight of the nsa. >> what was learned was nsa had in it ridley, -- inadvertently pulled the files of americans in violation of their own rules. they presented those problems to the court. the court said, this is not going to cut it. you will improve the safeguards and this is what happened. >> note how president obama the rule violations were accidental. this account ridley contradicts a statement the nsa has made. it said, " rare instances of violations of authority have been found" so not all of these violations were accidental. the president was right when he said fisa courts demanded it makes changes to its surveillance program. "the guardian" has a story about efforts to wring nsa into compliance with court orders. using new leaks from edward snowden, they uncovered that the nsa paid millions of taxpaye
newspaper reveals how he was pressured to destroy files he received from nsa whistleblower edward snowden. the top stories this hour. a look back at the top stories from the last seven days, and the latest on rt. damascus has given you when inspectors access to a site of an alleged chemical attack. the u.s. says it is nearly certain the assad government carried this out, a serious response alongside its ally, the uk. >> damascus has agreed to allow the u.n. access to the scene of the alleged attack, but while damascus says it will do its maximum to assure the safety of passage of the investigators, the actual territory is held, so ultimately, it will be the rebel forces who determine whether or not the you when inspectors have the access that they require. it is said that this now comes to old late. . we are hearing from the u.n. that they will, regardless, begin their investigation on moday. the united states has very little doubt that damascus was behind this chemical strike, and the intelligence is basing these claims on the number of reported deaths. we are hearing upwards of 100 peop
ahead. the nsa surveillance scandal taking a new twist overseas. the guardian's editor revealing that the british government forced the news publisher to destroy day-to-day from edward snowden. more on the government intimidation of the press coming up. in egypt, the crackdown of pro- morsi growing. a key leader of the muslim brotherhood was also arrested last night. more on the developments later in today's show. tuesday, august 20, 5:20 p.m. >> bradley manning is less than 20 hours from finding out how much time you'll spend behind bars after they found him guilty of stealing and sharing government secrets. the judge will make her final sentencing decision on wednesday. manning could face up to 90 years in prison. we have the latest from fort meade. >> the judge is now deliberating bradley manning's sentence. the judge announced that she would be beginning to deliberate. the sentences tomorrow morning and the importance to the judge in this case, facing a maximum of 90 years after he was found guilty of most of the charges against him including espionage. the closing argument
, their elected governments. as for the allegation that nsa surveillance is bigger than anything in the soviet union, so is the internet which did not exist or most of the soviet union. it was a little bit of intrigue considering how much the communication standards have changed. the fact that we are talking about this they say that is utter nonsense. they crackdown in prison and psychologically drug their descendents. it is any kind of rational debate. >> you might ask what is happening in guantÁnamo bay. that has gone on ever since. you might also ask yourself the question that if britain was so keen on detaining them for the maximum period, why didn't germany do something about it? to end any public discussion about this degree of surveillance. >> i want to bring up one point, as the romans would put it, the law is harsh but it is the law. in this case, it would be the law. breaking the law is ok? these programs constitute massive sweeping systematic invasions and the right to privacy. the active public interests, it is great personal risk. they seem more interested in persecuting mr. snow
roughneck 36. who else thinks the recent terrace is based -- is just propaganda to justify the nsa spying program? let me throw that over to the panel. does anybody believe this could be a counterplay to justify what has been said and done about edward snowden? the first person to speak will get the floor. >> >> is this something that comes to mind. >> i want to go back to the u.s. at some point. it would be a clever way to do it. you can have a real threat and at the same time you can overreact. to make people understand it is not done by a big bad government that wants to control everything, but it is linked to a real threat and real issues and real interest from an american point of view. >> the europeans will be involved for their own interests. we should not criticize the u.s. for doing something we would like to do ourselves. >> france has been engaged in similar activities and may be gone a little bit further. maybe people were surprised by the scale they were. people i know said we know this was going on anyway. is that something that might have occurred to you, that what was reve
for leaking details of the nsa surveillance programs. snowden has been holed up in the transit zone at moscow's airport since he arrived from hong kong on june 23rd. his lawyer gave an update on his status. >> translator: snowden has just left airport and has headed for a safer place. >> snowden had been asking russia for temporary asylum until he could relocate to latin america. some countries in that region have offered him political asylum. american authorities have been asking russian leaders to extradite him but the russians refused. snowden told the guardian newspaper and other media that nsa agents collect vast amounts of private internet and phone data at home and abroad. u.s. authorities defended the surveillance program saying they prevented terrorist attacks. >>> spokespersons for the russian presidential office say snowden entering russia will not have an impact on relations with the u.s., and they say it will not affect summit talks between presidents putin and obama scheduled for september. >>> japan's deputy prime minister taro aso has had to retract some recent remarks. they c
.s. information-gathering capabilities. while serving as the nsa director, hayden oversaw the surveillance of domestic communication carried out without warrants. hayden says snowden's case is very different from any other information leak in the past. >> it's not a glass of water or a bucket of water or a cup of water. that's bad enough. what snowden's revealed is what i choose to call the plumbing. he's revealed how it is we acquire information. he's revealed the sources and the methods we used to go out and get this data for the safety and for the liberty of american citizens. >> snowden first took refuge in hong kong before flying to moscow. hayden suspects that snowden may have leaked confidential information to officials in both china and russia. >> i do know both the chinese and the russian services are very sophisticated and, therefore, i have every expectation they will be using all the tools available to them if they thought that in these computers or thumb drives or disks or whatever he has with him, inside there were the key secrets of the american intelligence community, i thi
of the principal journalists between the nsa, edward snowden's leaks, and he was detained in heathrow airport. that is the maximum amount of time you can detain someone. and basically 97% is under this terrorism act. it lasts for less than one hour, and he was held for nine hours, so clearly, there is something there. the white house said it did give authorities a heads up as regards to him passing through heathrow airport. what is interesting is he had been going to berlin to meet with a person. there was a transfer of documents between him and berlin. he was transferring information. i think that might somehow intentionally explained this nine hour delay. and all of his material was confiscated. nothing was returned. nothing was returned. the guardian has been all over this story. and another story we look at, the editorial of "le monde" was on this today. if there is not a boycott, the propaganda for nontraditional sexuality, which is seen by many as targeting, sexual's, there was yesterday between a two russian athletes, and they risk legal action. needless to say, the editorial says the
the u.s. government assures us that the nsa does not gather data except it is little comfort. seeing who guards the guardians, i prefer the guardian. he is no supporter of edward snowden, but that we had to take blind faith that these secret courts are doing a good job. that is not quite enough. >> one of the horrifying aspects that they are looking at is that people can become conditioned to think that everything they do and think is being watched. that has major ethical and philosophical implications for the way people feel and the way people view themselves, it is a dangerous direction things are going. >> an addendum to that which is incredibly important, we have been finding fragments of information about private security companies and the government's fairly loosely monitored. the oversight question is where the outrage should be focused. snowden worked for a company, not for the government. i think there is one thing we should draw from this, we should learn more about the companies in the shadows. >> thank you for joining us. stay seated, before we go, we will say hello to james.
the spy agency misrepresented the scope of its collection. one judicial opinion from 2011 shows the nsa was given illegally -- was illegally gathering data. the agency admitted it made some mistakes. they could not separate out information that was entirely domestic. a rare interview with the president of nicaragua might daniel ortega. syria rebels claim the government has keeled -- killed discords of -- scores of people. the images are sobering. >> now for the latest on syria. opposition groups are accusing government forces of gassing hundreds near damascus. they say they fired rockets that released the deadly fumes. video shows bodies, allegedly victims of a massive chemical attack. the un security council has been holding an emergency meeting to discuss this latest attack. reporting from the u.n.. some of the following images may be distressing. >> this represents no matter what the conclusions are a serious escalation with grave consequences. >> strong words from a top u.n. official prompted a disturbing but unverified pictures like these trade after the close door session, and the
Search Results 0 to 12 of about 13